How to aggregate information from the Web (Part 3): recommended list of RSS feeds

Here’s the third and last part to this installment, and here’s the list of recommended sites that I subscribe to (well, almost all — this is the curated list). The ones with an * are highly recommended.

For technology news

For reviews

Other technology blogs*

  • Daring Fireball by John Gruber. This is one of the most definitive technology blogs out there, with a slight skew towards Apple stuff.
  • Fraser Speirs is best known as the guy who rolled out a 1:1 iPad deployment in a school. His blog is a great resource for schools and educators looking at tablet deployment and other technologies in education.
  • Paris Lemon by MG Siegler. Hailed as a über Apple fanboy by some, Siegler writes with force and clarity that few rival.
  • Shawn Blanc is a (relatively new) full-time writer and his blog is clean and a joy to read. His reviews on the HP TouchPad and OS X Lion were some of the best I’ve seen.
  • SimplicityIsBliss by Sven Fechner is a great resource for Getting Things Done (GTD) systems, or just productivity in general.
  • The Brooks Review by Ben Brooks has been a great resource to me in my own writings and learning of technology. Has a slight skew towards Apple stuff.
  • Macalope. The Macalope is a mythical creature that is totally crazy when it comes to defending the (you guessed it) Mac (meaning Apple stuff), and while it’s easy to dismiss it as yet another fanboy writing, the Macalope is witty and full of fun. Doesn’t hurt that the specific people he poke fun of are really rather bad, at least in terms of factual information and writing. So suspend your judgement for a while and enjoy some laughs checking out his writings.

Funnies

  • The Oatmeal. Be warned: it is über crude, but otherwise entirely true and witty.
  • XKCD is a unique webcomic using stick figures. Brilliant stuff.

What do I do with all these links?

All you need to do is to click on them, and you’d be redirected to the feed page. If you have a RSS reader app installed, and has chosen it to be the default reader, the feed will open in the app and you can choose to subscribe to it.

Or you could sign up with Google Reader (recommended, if you haven’t done so), and add the subscriptions by copying in the link. A simplified tutorial on how to do so can be found in Part 1 (link at the end of post).

———-

Well, that marks the end of the this series of three posts. Hope you’ve enjoyed it, and are able to navigate better in the new information explosion! If you have any questions, just drop a comment, mail or tweet. Do that too for any feeds that you’d like to recommend to the readers!

———-

Part 1 on Google Reader and a primer on RSS can be found here.

Part 2 on reading RSS, and read-it-later services can be found here.

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