TOOZE roundups: thoughts management, plain text

Thoughts management using Thoughtboxes

Web.AppStorm ran a review about Thoughtboxes, a Web app that allows you to capture your thoughts on a free-form canvas. It’s pretty similar to Popplet, another Web app that I love, but this one is a little different in that they allow you to mark thoughts and classify them linearly within different thought boxes, instead of the concept-map approach of Popplet. I haven’t tried it myself but it looks pretty good.

Train-example

How Thoughtboxes look like. Credit: Thoughtboxes

Link to Thoughtboxes in header; review by Web.AppStorm can be found here.

Plain text and Simplenote

Simplenote was one of the first few iOS apps I ever had, and it has stayed with me ever since. And I don’t think I’m pushing it if I said that it was the app that made plain text (note: rich text refers to text with formatting, like bold and italics; plain text are just words and spacings) popular again.

In short, Simplenote is a note-taking app but the true power of it (to me) is how it syncs across devices and apps that support it. For such a great service, Web.AppStorm did a review of it and if you haven’t tried Simplenote at all, you really should.

Link to Simplenote in header; review by Web.AppStorm here.

Password management with Mitto

Web.AppStorm very timely ran an timely article about Mitto, a Web based app that helps you manage all your online login credentials. Why did I say it was timely? Well, it happened after we finished our three-parter on password security over here at TOOZE, and while I mentioned the benefits of a password manager, it’s a habit that many are not prone to undertake, unless compromised (which I hope will never happen!)

To do a quick recap, here’s what we haven been talking about:

  • Part 1 covers the need for a unique password for each site that you go to, and highlights the computing power of modern hardware in hacking.
  • Part 2 covers the difficult choice of choosing a good yet usable password.
  • Part 3 covers the usage of a password manager to well, manage all those pesky individual passwords.

So check out Mitto if you don’t already have a password manager, and be safe!

Link to Mitto in header; review by Web.AppStorm here. Link to the first part of our post on password security can be found here.

Kirk Tuck with the Olympus PEN E-P3

Kirk Tuck, a well-known photographer spent some time with the Olympus EP3 and did a very extensive usage review of it. Personally, I’m not a big fan of the Micro Four Thirds (MFT) system as it felt like a weird hybrid between a compact and a dSLR; then again, it is that mix which has created many loyalists. The other thing is that being in its relative infancy, MFT systems are rather expensive, and have a limited range of lenses available. However, let me quote from Tuck’s article:

People on the forums have taken Olympus to task for the price of the camera and me to task for daring to mention how much the EP3’s other branded predecessors cost… You pay a premium for design but then you get to use a camera that’s beautifully designed. Very few people will buy an EP3 with the intention of making it their sole business camera. That’s just not its role. It is an artists camera and while there are many camera choices on the market people gravitate to cameras that make them feel productive and make them feel creative. If you are a person with a spreadsheet mindset and must quantify every camera purchase with a series of metrics and check off lists then the Pen is very much not for you. Stop reading and buy the Rebel T3i. It was made for the check list people. But you can’t really put a hard price on good design and good ergonomics… But the important thing to understand is that different attributes have different values to different people and artists don’t have to justify their tool purchases to engineers.

And another:

If you think the Olympus is overpriced then it is. For you. I am a veteran buyer of many Leicas and, for what they were able to accomplish, I didn’t think they were over priced. You just can’t over estimate how important the feel of a camera in your hand is until you spend hours each day with it.

It’s a brilliant article, even if you are not interested in the PEN; for there is a lot to learn from it about how to judge a camera, and how to evaluate a tool (hopefully) more objectively.

Link to article in header.

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